What You Need to Know About Sarcoma

What You Need to Know About Sarcoma

Dr. Herbert Loong is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Clinical Oncology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and is Deputy Medical Director of the university’s Phase 1 Clinical Trials Centre. He also founded and leads the Adult Sarcoma Multidisciplinary Team at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Hong Kong. You can follow him on Twitter at @herbloong. What are sarcomas? Sarcomas are a group of rare diseases that develop in the body’s muscle, bone, nerves, cartilage, tendons, blood vessels, and fatty and fibrous tissues. There are…

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Berries and Grapes May Keep You Breathin’ Easy

Berries and Grapes May Keep You Breathin’ Easy

MONDAY, May 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Adding more grapes and berries to your diet is a tasty way to give your lung health a boost, new research suggests. Folks who ate the most foods with a particular type of flavonoid, called anthocyanins, maintained the best lung function as they aged, researchers said. Anthocyanins are found in dark-pigmented fruits and vegetables such as red grapes, blueberries and purple potatoes. “A diet rich in fruits and vegetables can help protect the lungs against damage, preserving their functionality and reducing the risk…

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ASCO Annual Meeting 2018: A Preview of This Year’s Research

ASCO Annual Meeting 2018: A Preview of This Year’s Research

The theme of the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting is Delivering Discoveries: Expanding the Reach of Precision Medicine. Precision medicine has led to many advances in cancer care, but there is still much to learn in this growing field of research. Even more, as ASCO President Bruce E. Johnson, MD, FASCO, writes in this year’s Clinical Cancer Advances report, the promise of precision medicine “is only as good as our ability to make these treatments available to all patients.” While much of the cancer research at…

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Dilemma for Cancer Patients as Life-Saving Meds Are Tied to Vision Loss

Dilemma for Cancer Patients as Life-Saving Meds Are Tied to Vision Loss

FRIDAY, May 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A newer type of cancer treatment may offer the chance of longer survival, but the drugs could also trigger new side effects, such as vision problems. New research reports on three cases of a potentially vision-threatening eye condition called uveal effusion that patients developed after taking cancer immunotherapy. Immunotherapy uses a person’s own immune system to fight cancer. Uveal effusion occurs when the eye becomes inflamed and fluid collects in the three layers that make up the wall of the eye, the researchers…

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“Your Stories” Podcasts: Motivations for Giving the Best Cancer Care

“Your Stories” Podcasts: Motivations for Giving the Best Cancer Care

ASCO’s Conquer Cancer Foundation has developed the podcast series, Your Stories: Conquering Cancer. These recordings showcase candid conversations between patients and their loved ones, family members who have lost a loved one to cancer, and the stories behind the science of researching the disease.  The many professionals who work to bring the best care to people with cancer have their own stories driving them. These featured podcasts focus on what inspires them to strive for a better world. Curing a cancer is the goal and dream of every researcher. One…

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Shield Your Kids From the Sun’s Damaging Rays

Shield Your Kids From the Sun’s Damaging Rays

SUNDAY, May 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Sun damage puts children and teens at risk for deadly melanoma, so parents need to protect their youngsters from the sun and teach them about sun safety, oncologists say. “Don’t assume children cannot get skin cancer because of their age,” said Dr. Alberto Pappo, director of the solid tumor division at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. “Unlike other cancers, the conventional melanoma that we see mostly in adolescents behaves the same as it does in adults,” he explained in a…

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Living With HIV? Here’s What You Need to Know About Cancer

Living With HIV? Here’s What You Need to Know About Cancer

Dr. Ramya Ramaswami is an oncologist in the HIV and AIDS Malignancy Branch of the National Cancer Institute. She cares for people with HIV and cancer. In 1981, several cases of a rare skin cancer called Kaposi sarcoma were reported in young gay men. This alerted the medical community to the existence of a new condition called acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and its underlying cause, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Over the next several years, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and cervical cancer were also seen among people with AIDS. These 3 conditions—Kaposi sarcoma,…

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Expert Panel Highlights Patient Choice for Prostate Cancer Screen

Expert Panel Highlights Patient Choice for Prostate Cancer Screen

TUESDAY, May 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) — More men could receive PSA blood tests for prostate cancer under revised guidelines released Tuesday by the nation’s leading panel on preventive medicine. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) now recommends that men aged 55 to 69 decide for themselves whether to undergo a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, after talking it over with their doctor. This blood test looks for a protein produced by the prostate, a small walnut-shaped gland that produces seminal fluid. Cancerous prostate tissue produces higher levels of PSA….

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How to Safely Handle and Dispose Medication

How to Safely Handle and Dispose Medication

During and after cancer treatment, you may have medication to take at home. This may include chemotherapy in a form such as a pill that is taken by mouth, called oral chemotherapy.  There may also be medicine for symptoms and side effects, such as opioid pain medication. It is important for you and your family caregivers to know the safest ways to store and dispose of specific types of medication. In this podcast, Paul Celano, MD, talks about topics related to patient safety as well as how to dispose of…

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Drug Duo Approved for Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

Drug Duo Approved for Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

FRIDAY, May 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Two anti-cancer drugs administered together have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat an inherited form of thyroid cancer. Tafinlar (dabrafenib) and Mekinist (trametinib) combined have been approved to treat anaplastic thyroid cancer caused by an abnormal BRAF V600E gene, the agency said Friday in a news release. Anaplastic thyroid cancer is a rare, yet aggressive form of the disease. Almost 54,000 people will be diagnosed with thyroid cancer in the United States this year, and more than 2,000…

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