How to Honor Your Loved One Through Cancer Advocacy

How to Honor Your Loved One Through Cancer Advocacy

Voices on Cancer is an award-winning Cancer.Net Blog series where advocates share their stories and the lessons they have learned about being a cancer advocate. Valerie Guild is President of AIM at Melanoma, an international melanoma foundation engaged and invested in advancing melanoma care through innovative research, legislative reform, education, and patient and caregiver support. Valerie began working in melanoma advocacy in 2003 after the death of her daughter, Charlie, at the age of 26, from melanoma.             My advocacy story In 2003, my daughter, Charlie, lived and worked in San Francisco, packing…

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How Much Does Your Doctor Actually Know About Nutrition?

How Much Does Your Doctor Actually Know About Nutrition?

MONDAY, April 30, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Eat more fresh fruits and vegetables. Cut down on sweets and processed foods. Increase consumption of fish, nuts and legumes. This rudimentary advice has been dished out to the public for decades, yet soaring rates of diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure and other chronic illnesses linked to poor diet — and which increase risks for stroke and heart disease — fail to reverse. Part of the problem stems from the fact that doctors don’t know how to provide information beyond the basics….

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Coping With Stress When You Have Cancer

Coping With Stress When You Have Cancer

It should be no surprise that cancer treatment centers, hospitals, and outpatient clinics may sometimes feel like stressful environments. Stress is a frequent companion to cancer, and it needs to be acknowledged, even accepted. A cancer diagnosis affects a person’s relationships, productivity, and well-being. Medical appointments, treatment side effects, unforeseen costs, and worries about an uncertain future can create stress in the lives of people with cancer and of their caregivers. Knowing the physical signs of stress you experience can help one understand what’s caused a sore neck or a…

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Outdoor Job? Skin Cancer Can Take a Hefty Toll

Outdoor Job? Skin Cancer Can Take a Hefty Toll

FRIDAY, April 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Construction workers, farmers and others who work in the sun are at greater risk for skin cancer, according to researchers. And a new study reveals these job-related cancers cost nations millions in medical expenses. The researchers said lawmakers should address this trend and take steps to reduce job-related exposure to the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays. “The findings suggest that policymakers might give greater priority to reducing sun exposure at work by allocating occupational cancer prevention resources accordingly,” said lead investigator Emile Tompa, a…

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How to Donate Your Hair in 3 Simple Steps

How to Donate Your Hair in 3 Simple Steps

Thinking about donating your hair? There are several organizations and programs that can turn your long locks into free or low-cost wigs for people with cancer. A wig can give self-confidence, strength, and hope to someone struggling with the emotional challenges of hair loss. Here’s how to make the kindest cut of all: 1. Choose where to send your hair. Every hair donation organization has its own mission and goals. Do a little research to make sure that you’re comfortable with who receives the wigs and how. For example, Pantene Beautiful…

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Heavy Drinking Could Raise Your Gum Disease Risk

Heavy Drinking Could Raise Your Gum Disease Risk

TUESDAY, April 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People who drink more than the recommended daily limit of alcohol may harbor an unhealthy mix of bacteria in their mouths, a new study suggests. Researchers found that compared with nondrinkers, those who drank relatively heavily had fewer “good” bacteria in their mouths. They were also hosting more “bad” bacteria — including bugs that have been linked to gum disease, heart disease and cancer. The study is one of the latest to look at what factors influence the human “microbiome” — the trillions…

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How to Talk to Your Preschooler About Cancer

How to Talk to Your Preschooler About Cancer

Brittany Sullivan is a 6-time alveolar soft part sarcoma survivor who advocates for cancer research. She writes about her ongoing experience with cancer on her blog, The Sullivan Story. Listen to Brittany and John Sullivan share their story in a Conquer Cancer podcast. I’ve had cancer 6 times throughout my life. First, as a small child, all the way to the present, as a 29-year-old mother. The hardest moments were the moments when I was contemplating how to tell my almost 3-year-old what would be happening. If a cancer diagnosis…

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Could a Tattoo Someday Spot Your Cancer?

Could a Tattoo Someday Spot Your Cancer?

THURSDAY, April 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Tattoos serve many purposes, perhaps expressing artistry, loyalty or love. Now, scientists working with mice say they’ve engineered a medical “tattoo” that can screen for early signs of major disease. The biomedical tattoo is made up of cells embedded with sensors that measure levels of blood calcium. It’s initially invisible when implanted under the skin. But the sensors become apparent if blood calcium levels rise. This indicates a condition called hypercalcemia, which is a marker for several cancers and other major diseases. “Forty…

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Cancer Stage: 5 Important Reasons to Know Yours

Cancer Stage: 5 Important Reasons to Know Yours

Sue Chang, MD, FCAP, is an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Pathology at City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, CA. Not sure what your cancer stage is or what it means? Now’s a great time to get informed, as even your health care team is learning new things about cancer staging. The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) recently released the latest edition of its cancer staging manual with new and updated staging for many types of cancer. Most cancer treatment centers started using the updated…

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Drug Keytruda May Help Block Melanoma’s Return

Drug Keytruda May Help Block Melanoma’s Return

MONDAY, April 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Taking the drug Keytruda after surgery for advanced melanoma significantly reduced patients’ risk of their cancer returning, a new study found. Last May, Keytruda (pembrolizumab) became the first ever drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to fight cancers based on specific tumor genetics, rather than where in the body the tumor occurs. The drug also gained attention after former President Jimmy Carter announced in 2015 that Keytruda had beaten back his brain cancer. But would it work against advanced melanomas,…

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