Obamacare May Have Helped More Women Spot Cancer Early

Obamacare May Have Helped More Women Spot Cancer Early

MONDAY, July 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Earlier diagnosis of gynecologic cancers is on the rise among young women in the United States because more of them have health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, a new study maintains. Each year, about 2,000 U.S. women under age 26 are diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer — including cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal and vulvar cancers. Early diagnosis is key to successful treatment and a woman’s future ability to have children. “It can take decades to observe changes in population-based health trends, so…

Read More

An Advocate’s Perspective on Patient-Centered Care

An Advocate’s Perspective on Patient-Centered Care

Voices on Cancer is an award-winning Cancer.Net Blog series where advocates share their stories and the lessons they have learned about being a cancer advocate. Attorney Meg Gaines found a calling to be a patient advocate after her own cancer experience. Gaines’ self-advocacy helped her through her extended and difficult diagnosis and treatment process in the 1990s. After her successful treatment, she wanted to empower other people with cancer to advocate for their care. Her first opportunity came unexpectedly, when her oncologist asked her to help cheer up a patient who…

Read More

Cancer Survival Drops With Complementary Therapy: Study

Cancer Survival Drops With Complementary Therapy: Study

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People with curable cancers who try “complementary therapy” often refuse some part of standard care. And they may die as a result, researchers say. U.S. cancer patients increasingly use complementary medicine — a combination of standard care along with therapies that fall outside of mainstream medicine (such as acupuncture or massage). But little is known about the long-term results, according to researchers at Yale University. “Past research into why patients use non-medical complementary treatments has shown the majority of cancer patients who use…

Read More

2018 Research Round Up Podcast: Sarcomas, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Kidney Cancer, and Brain Tumors

2018 Research Round Up Podcast: Sarcomas, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Kidney Cancer, and Brain Tumors

The ASCO Annual Meeting brings together physicians, researchers, patient advocates, and other health care professionals to present and discuss significant new research across all types of cancer and the spectrum of cancer care, from prevention, through treatment, and into survivorship. But with more than 5,800 abstracts presented at the meeting and online, it’s hard to keep up with all of the research news. The Cancer.Net Associate Editors are here to help sort through the science. In the Research Round Up podcast series, they share their thoughts on what is exciting…

Read More

If You’re 45 or Older, Get Screened for Colorectal Cancer

If You’re 45 or Older, Get Screened for Colorectal Cancer

(HealthDay News) — The American Cancer Society’s new colorectal cancer screening guidelines recommend that people at average risk start screening at age 45. That’s a drop of five years from the former guidelines, which recommended the first screening at age 50. In lowering the age recommendation, the society cited rising numbers of colorectal cancer cases among younger Americans. Screening should begin even earlier for people at higher risk of contracting colorectal cancer, the society says. Risk factors for earlier screening include: A family or personal history of colorectal cancer…

Read More

HPV Shot Eliminates Advanced Skin Cancer in 97-Year-Old

HPV Shot Eliminates Advanced Skin Cancer in 97-Year-Old

FRIDAY, July 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Two years ago, Ian McKenzie thought his mom’s remaining days were dwindling. The 97-year-old woman had developed a severe case of what was thought to be an untreatable form of squamous cell carcinoma, the second leading form of skin cancer. Lesions had developed over much of her right leg, in such numbers and size that chemotherapy and surgery were ruled out as treatments. On a hunch, her doctor, Dr. Anna Nichols of the University of Miami’s Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, tried an unorthodox…

Read More

Deciding on a Cancer Clinical Trial? 4 Things to Ask

Deciding on a Cancer Clinical Trial? 4 Things to Ask

Shilpa Gupta, MD, is an associate professor and lead for the Solid Tumor Phase 1 Program at University of Minnesota. She specializes in genitourinary cancers and has extensive experience with immunotherapy in her practice and as part of clinical trials. Follow Dr. Gupta on Twitter @shilpaonc. What is a cancer clinical trial?  Clinical trials are research studies that involve volunteers. They help doctors find better ways to treat cancer.   Clinical trials also look for ways to improve quality of life for people with cancer. Through clinical trials, researchers determine…

Read More

Infertility, Not Fertility Drugs, Linked to Raised Risk of Ovarian Cancer

Infertility, Not Fertility Drugs, Linked to Raised Risk of Ovarian Cancer

FRIDAY, July 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Fertility drugs do not increase a woman’s risk of ovarian cancer, a new study suggests. It did find that infertility itself is associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. The researchers examined data from more than 58,000 women in Denmark who had infertility treatments (ART, or assisted reproduction technology) between 1994 and 2015. The investigators then compared them with more than 549,000 women who did not undergo ART. “We found that the higher risk of ovarian cancer among women having assisted reproduction…

Read More

Did You Know: 2 Surprising Sources of Foodborne Bacteria

Did You Know: 2 Surprising Sources of Foodborne Bacteria

Adam Ghering is a public affairs specialist with the Food Safety and Inspection Service at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Most people would say that they can tell pretty quickly what is clean and what is dirty. If you see stains on your pants, you know that your pants are dirty. However, seeing whether bacteria is on your food is an entirely different story.  All foodborne bacteria are microscopic and can’t be seen with the naked eye, so it is difficult to know if your foods have been cross-contaminated. Bacteria…

Read More

850 Million People Worldwide Have Kidney Disease

850 Million People Worldwide Have Kidney Disease

THURSDAY, July 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Kidney disease is a “hidden epidemic” affecting more than 850 million people worldwide, renal experts say. That’s twice the number of diabetics (422 million) and more than 20 times the number of people with cancer (42 million) or HIV/AIDS (36.7 million). But most people don’t realize that kidney disease is a major health issue. “It is high time to put the global spread of kidney diseases into focus,” said David Harris and Adeera Levin of the International Society of Nephrology. Harris is the…

Read More